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Thanks to the Siena International Photo Awards contest for reminding us that no matter how many images we have appreciated, there are still boundless examples of culture and nature to be captured by talented photographers and shared for our amazement and enjoyment.  Only in its second year, SIPA has already become an important staple of the international photography community with entries by photographers from over 100 countries.  We are fortunate to have explanations for most of the images.

A strawberry-picker walks between colourful greenhouses near Nazilli, in the Aydın province of Turkey. By Leyla Emektar

Fushimi Inari Shrine, Japan By pascal Mannaerts

Floating market, Malaysia . Water transportation plays an important role in everyday life in South Borneo. Photo by Antonius Andre Tjiu

A Bahraini Muslim woman carrying her son while taking part in a funeral in Sitra Village, South Manama on March 22, 2011. Photo by Isa Ebrahim

By Pascal Mannaerts

A woman in the small fishing village of Phan Rang in southern Vietnam is making a traditional fishing net. Handmade fishing nets are typically manufactured by women while the men are responsible for catching fish. By Danny Yen Sin Wong

Eruption of Mt. Etna By Giuseppe Mario Famiani, Italy

During a Dharma assembly in the monastery of Labrang Lamasery, due to the heavy snow, all the monks’ robes were covered with a thick layer of snow. Photo by Jian Huang

Chinese fishermen on the Ou river close to the city of Lishui – whose name means Beautiful Water.    By Vladimir Proshin

On the sand dunes of Mui Ne, in South Vietnam, three girls are walking along the slope wearing their typical cone hats and carrying their scales.  Photo by anny Yen Sin Wong

Shwamibagh temple, Bangladesh, The Hindu community celebrating the three-day Rakher Upabas festival. Devotees offer prayers after lighting earthen lamps and fast until the lamps have burned out. Photo by Noor Ahmed Gelal

Coming to get salt, by Jørgen Johanson. The Danakil Depression in Ethiopia is one of the hottest, the lowest and the most inhospitable places on earth. Asale lake is 116 metres below sea level. The Afar people extract salt using camels for transport.

At the Santa Catalina monastery in Arequipa, Peru, cloistered novices play volleyball. They pray nine times a day and live their lives in silence but, during this short break, they spend time together in the garden. By Melissa Farlow

When the ponds are drained in the Barycz Valley, Poland thousands of birds gather to eat fish. First came the first egrets and gulls. When an eagle appeared all the gulls flew off while the egrets stood motionless creating this striking image. By Mateusz Piesiak in Poland.

Aerial perspective of the red chilli harvest season in Bayingolin Mongol prefecture, Xinjiang, China, when farmers pick and leave them to dry in the sun. Photo by Hanbin Wang.

By Jiming Lv in China

While going to the beach in Basiskele, Kocaeli Turkey to take photos, the shadow of some people in a cafe, caught my attention. I decided to wait for the sunset in order to emphasize the shadow effect. After a few shots, someone suddenly looked out a window providing another interesting frame. By Leyla Emektar

Red mist in Alba. An autumnal glimpse of vineyards near Alba in the Langhe hills of Piedmont, Italy. Photo by Valentina Galvagno

Sprinkle Net. Photo by Fuyang Zhou

Ripples in tea, China. Harvest time at a high-quality, ecological tea plantation in Jinlu village in China’s Zhejiang province. Photo by Hong Ding

By The Eng Loe Djatinegoro of Indonesia

At prayer in Bagan, Myanmar, by Lim Chee Keong

“Beehive” Sunbathers in Sellin, Rügen Island, Germany, by Massimo della Latta

These saline shallows in northern Kenya are populated by millions of flamingos visible to the careful viewer. By Franco Cappellari.

Another view. By Jay Roode, Zambia

By Yousef Masoud, Saudi Arabia

This project carried out by locals is for aging wine directly in the ground which is rich in minerals.


Optical illusion floor, Image by Mauro Cenci of Italy

Orangutang in Bali, Indonesia uses an umbrella, by Andrew Suryono

By Massimiliano Broggi, Italy

Thanks to Siena International Photo Awards.  Also to Bored Panda and Wim for getting me started on this post.

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19 thoughts on “Siena International Photo Awards

  1. Thank you once again, Dusky. These pictures are literally breathtaking.

  2. These all have the wow factor, but my favorite is the naked mother and babe (and the monkey is pretty cute!)

  3. Totally impressed, not only with each photo’s content but the quality and abundance of the color is a great WOW factor for me. Glad I am not a part of that floating market traffic jam, grin, but they all seemed to have adjusted the their circumstances.

    Thank you for passing on the Photo Awards. Just fantastic.

  4. Each time I look forward to your publication, and each time I give it a more enthusiastic “WOW”! Thank you soooo much, you always make my day! Keep up the good work !

  5. What more could one say beyond THANK YOU for sharing the beauty of our world and humankind?

    Bless your heart!

  6. I always look forward to your photos. We live in a remarkable world and you manage to make it even more so with your sometimes simple photos of nature and your surroundings. Thank you.

  7. I was ‘wondering” just yesterday, when will you come, and ‘lo today you are here. Forever grateful and often tearful at the beauty around us! Even the monkey knows all.

  8. Thank you for sharing the wonderful photos. It is so good of you to compile them.

  9. Wonderfull photos.Thank you Sienna International and Dusky’s Wonder Site.
    I also thank to my citizen LEYLA BAYRAKTAR.

  10. Wszystkie Panstwa publikacje ,to “cacuszka” w dziedzinie fotografii !!

  11. I have followed you for over a year now, and every set of pics are are even a little more Fantastic! THANKS

  12. I look forward to your awesome photography…breath-taking, beautiful, interesting, funny, words cannot describe it.

  13. Thanks for sharing. One who hasn’t absorbed remote cultures becomes aware of their narrow little concept of life that is experienced in our mistaken sense of being a superior culture because of our relative wealth. Thanks. Bob

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